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The online journal of Luke Dockery

2019 Harding University Lectureship Recap

I am a little late posting this, but I wanted to provide a quick recap of Harding University’s 96th annual Bible Lectureship, which was September 29-October 2. The theme for this year was “Fan the Flame—Acts: Renewed by the Power of the Holy Spirit.” This was my third time to take part as a presenter at Lectureship (I was part of a panel for young ministers), but this was my first time to take part as a resident of Searcy, so it was nice to be able to enjoy the many sessions and also sleep in my own bed. 🙂

I was privileged to attend several good lectures and classes, and here is a brief recap of what I went to:

  • Restoring an Acts 2 Church, David Young: David is the preacher at the North Boulevard Church of Christ in Murfreesboro, TN, and kicked off Lectureship with this keynote on Sunday night. This was a highpoint for me. I was reading Young’s book, New Day: Restoring the Revolutionary Mission of Christ’s Church before and during Lectureship, and was really tracking with much of what he had to say. Short version: Churches of Christ (and churches across the spectrum) are declining in the US, and the solution is to get serious about making disciples and planting churches. Another helpful takeaway: as a church (or an individual, I guess), you can seek to be comfortable, or you can seek to be awesome; there is no overlap between the two. In addition to this keynote, I also attended Young’s two class sessions on Monday, which further covered similar material.
  • Devoted to the Apostles’ Doctrine, Scott Adair: Dr. Adair is on the Bible faculty at Harding, and recently has been developing a proposal for unity by identifying the central tenants of the Christian faith by mining the practice of baptism. In this lesson, he used the sermon material from the Book of Acts to highlight these same central beliefs: (1) Jesus Christ is Lord, Son of God; (2) A Belief in One God, who is Father, Son, and Spirit; (3) The Death and Resurrection of Jesus; (4) The Church as the Assembly of the Saints; (5) Forgiveness of Sins; (6) The Gift of the Holy Spirit; (7) Resurrection of the Dead. There is still more to work out beyond these beliefs (each has ethical demands that goes along with it), but I do think this is a helpful framework for trying to distinguish between preferences, important convictions, and foundational gospel matters.
  • Resurrection Preaching, Fate Hagood: Fate is a preacher from California, and presented a really stirring message during Monday evening’s keynote session on the nature of resurrection preaching from the Book of Acts. While he said a lot of good things, his closing was incredibly powerful for me, as he used Paul’s reasoning from his block of teaching in 1 Corinthians 15 to encourage us that our labor for the Lord is not in vain.
  • Devoted to the Breaking of Bread, B. Chris Simpson:  B. Chris has been a great speaker for as long as I have known him, and the depth and quality of his content just gets better and better. He presented a thoughtful and powerful lesson emphasizing that if we wish to resemble the Acts 2 church, we must be similarly devoted to food and fellowship, and the radical hospitality they practiced.
  • Intentional Connections with Parents and Teens, Brent Wilhite: Brent is one of the youth ministers at the College Church of Christ here in Searcy, and talked about current trends for teenagers both in the church and in the culture at large, and also tips for building resilient faith within teens. Brent had a lot of good content, and I felt like he could have gone for another thirty minutes.
  • Devoted to Fellowship, Harold Shank: I had heard of Harold Shank before, who is well known in Oklahoma Christian circles, but I had never heard him speak. I enjoyed his Tuesday night keynote, where he discussed why the early church was devoted to fellowship, and dreamed aloud what Acts 2 churches might look like in modern contexts.
  • Devoted to Prayer, Juan Meza: Juan was a former classmate of mine, and serves as the Latino Minister at the Church of Christ at White Station in Memphis. I thought he did a good job discussing how prayer builds our relationship with God, its power, and its purpose. It was all the more impressive to me because he was presenting in a second language!
  • A Dialogue on Two Views of Heaven, Dan Chambers and Ralph Gilmore: This was a discussion on the nature of eternal life: will eternity be spent with God in a spiritual heaven (“up there” somewhere), or will it God come to dwell with His people on a renewed earth (“down here” somewhere)? On the whole, I was disappointed in this. The two men had not shared their notes ahead of time, and I thought this was a mistake as it lead to a disjointed conversation, where Chambers was presenting his perspective on a renewed earth, while Gilmore tried to anticipate Chambers’ arguments and refute them rather than actually present his own perspective on heaven. On the positive side, the two men repeatedly affirmed their love and respect for one another and were adamant that this was not a fellowship issue, or something to be divisive about. I appreciated that.
  • Artifacts and Acts, Part 3: The Flame in Jerusalem, Dale Manor: Dr. Manor is a treasure—a classically-trained archaeologist with a wealth of information about the ancient world, and I try to catch one of his lectures each year. This one focused on some archaeological finds and background information from Corinth, Ephesus, Jerusalem, and Caesarea.
  • This Is Us, Part 3: Spiritual Ancestry of Churches of Christ, Monte Cox: Dr. Cox is another favorite of mine, and I thought he had some good things to say about the history of Churches of Christ and our future. He talked about the early days of the Restoration Movement (focusing on Thomas and Alexander Campbell and Barton W. Stone) and their strong emphasis on unity. In the 20th century, the (unofficial) list of essential doctrines grew longer and longer, and a unity movement became increasingly fractured. He concluded by posing the question: are Churches of Christ in crisis, or are we experiencing a reorientation toward Christ at the center?
  • Boldness In Adversity, Jesse Robertson: Jesse is a New Testament professor at Harding, and also a deacon at Cloverdale (where I work), and is someone I have come to deeply respect and appreciate. He closed out Lectureship on Wednesday by focusing on the boldness that we witness in the Book of Acts: it is something the apostles repeatedly prayed for and then evidenced in their lives. Jesse passionately implored us to pray for courage as we seek to tell the world about Jesus. As he pointed out insightfully: it takes one kind of courage to speak truth to your enemies; it takes another kind of courage to speak truth to your friends.

As always, Lectureship was a blessing for me and I greatly enjoyed it.  I would highly recommend taking part in this next year if you are able!

2 Comments

  1. You made me wish I had been there! I would love to hear more about the Acts 2 church being devoted to food and fellowship and the radical hospitality they practiced. Ladies Ministries might scoff at the importance or purpose of baking cookies for visitors or bread for home bound members but I personally believe the personal touch and simple gestures of kindness and thoughtfulness are very important. To take that idea further and meet real needs for food is important but difficult so we shy away from the challenges of doing that. Now that I’m retired I hope I can attend inspiring and challenging lectureships. Miss you, Brother.

    • Luke

      October 15, 2019 at 6:15 PM

      Darlene,

      It was a great week, and I highly recommend it for the future! The good news is that they post audio recordings of all the lectures, so they should be available soon to download the topics you are interest in.

      Hospitality was such a central part of the life of the early church, and I think it is a shame that as our culture has largely trended away from that, we have in the church too. I think you are right to seek ways in which we can restore that aspect of our communal life.

      Miss you too!

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