The Doc File

The online journal of Luke Dockery

Category: Discipleship (page 1 of 5)

The Example of Charles Spurgeon (Why You are Not Too Busy to Disciple your Children at Home)

I write and speak frequently about the importance of parents intentionally working to pass on their faith to their children, because parents are the primary spiritual influences in the lives of their kids. Certainly churches and youth ministries should partner with parents and provide additional teaching and instruction in this regard, but the reality is that this should be extra: the primary spiritual training a child receives should come in the home.

That can be challenging, though, because we live in a time when everyone is busy, and extreme busyness can almost become a badge of honor. In addition to this being out of place with the biblical principle of Sabbath and the importance of rest, I think it is also problematic because it is frequently used as an excuse for why we do not do the things that we know we should. For example, Christian parents know that they should regularly read Scripture, pray, and talk about God with their children, but our lives are just so busy that these important tasks can get pushed aside by other urgent-but-significantly-less-important tasks.

But this excuse is just that: an excuse. The reality is that we can make time for the things we truly believe are important. I was reading a book a while back, and the example of the famous 19th-century preacher Charles Spurgeon impressed this reality upon me (the quotation below came from a footnote, but was so amazing to me that I wanted to feature it in this post):

Some may think Spurgeon lived in a much simpler era that afforded him more time to practice family worship than Christians would have today. I’ve conducted a great deal of PhD research on Spurgeon’s life and pastoral ministry, and can confirm this isn’t so. Spurgeon’s autobiography, as well as many first-hand observers, tell us that Spurgeon (1)  pastored the largest evangelical church in the world at that time (with more than six thousand active members), (2) preached almost every day, (3) edited his sermons for weekly publications, and thereby (4) produced (in the sixty-four volume Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit) the largest collection of works by any single author in English, (5) wrote an additional one hundred and twenty books (one every four months throughout his entire adult life), (6) presided over sixty-six different ministries (such as the pastors’ college he founded), (7) edited a monthly magazine (The Sword and the Trowel), (8) typically read five books each week, many of which he reviewed for his magazine, and (9) wrote with a dip pen five hundred letters per week. God gave Spurgeon an extraordinary capacity for work and productivity. And yet, despited the ceaseless, crushing demands of his schedule, at six each evening, setting aside a to-do list that few could match today, he gathered his wife, twin boys, and all other present in his home at the time for family worship.[1]

This is absolutely mind-blowing to me, and convicts me of at least two things: (1) I need to pray that God expands my capacity and increases my efficiency so I can do more work in His kingdom, and (2) if Charles Spurgeon could make time to pray and read Scripture with his children, then I certainly can as well. We all can—we just have to truly believe that it is important.


[1] Donald S. Whitney, Family Worship (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2016): 73-74.

2019 Harding University Lectureship Recap

I am a little late posting this, but I wanted to provide a quick recap of Harding University’s 96th annual Bible Lectureship, which was September 29-October 2. The theme for this year was “Fan the Flame—Acts: Renewed by the Power of the Holy Spirit.” This was my third time to take part as a presenter at Lectureship (I was part of a panel for young ministers), but this was my first time to take part as a resident of Searcy, so it was nice to be able to enjoy the many sessions and also sleep in my own bed. 🙂

I was privileged to attend several good lectures and classes, and here is a brief recap of what I went to:

  • Restoring an Acts 2 Church, David Young: David is the preacher at the North Boulevard Church of Christ in Murfreesboro, TN, and kicked off Lectureship with this keynote on Sunday night. This was a highpoint for me. I was reading Young’s book, New Day: Restoring the Revolutionary Mission of Christ’s Church before and during Lectureship, and was really tracking with much of what he had to say. Short version: Churches of Christ (and churches across the spectrum) are declining in the US, and the solution is to get serious about making disciples and planting churches. Another helpful takeaway: as a church (or an individual, I guess), you can seek to be comfortable, or you can seek to be awesome; there is no overlap between the two. In addition to this keynote, I also attended Young’s two class sessions on Monday, which further covered similar material.
  • Devoted to the Apostles’ Doctrine, Scott Adair: Dr. Adair is on the Bible faculty at Harding, and recently has been developing a proposal for unity by identifying the central tenants of the Christian faith by mining the practice of baptism. In this lesson, he used the sermon material from the Book of Acts to highlight these same central beliefs: (1) Jesus Christ is Lord, Son of God; (2) A Belief in One God, who is Father, Son, and Spirit; (3) The Death and Resurrection of Jesus; (4) The Church as the Assembly of the Saints; (5) Forgiveness of Sins; (6) The Gift of the Holy Spirit; (7) Resurrection of the Dead. There is still more to work out beyond these beliefs (each has ethical demands that goes along with it), but I do think this is a helpful framework for trying to distinguish between preferences, important convictions, and foundational gospel matters.
  • Resurrection Preaching, Fate Hagood: Fate is a preacher from California, and presented a really stirring message during Monday evening’s keynote session on the nature of resurrection preaching from the Book of Acts. While he said a lot of good things, his closing was incredibly powerful for me, as he used Paul’s reasoning from his block of teaching in 1 Corinthians 15 to encourage us that our labor for the Lord is not in vain.
  • Devoted to the Breaking of Bread, B. Chris Simpson:  B. Chris has been a great speaker for as long as I have known him, and the depth and quality of his content just gets better and better. He presented a thoughtful and powerful lesson emphasizing that if we wish to resemble the Acts 2 church, we must be similarly devoted to food and fellowship, and the radical hospitality they practiced.
  • Intentional Connections with Parents and Teens, Brent Wilhite: Brent is one of the youth ministers at the College Church of Christ here in Searcy, and talked about current trends for teenagers both in the church and in the culture at large, and also tips for building resilient faith within teens. Brent had a lot of good content, and I felt like he could have gone for another thirty minutes.
  • Devoted to Fellowship, Harold Shank: I had heard of Harold Shank before, who is well known in Oklahoma Christian circles, but I had never heard him speak. I enjoyed his Tuesday night keynote, where he discussed why the early church was devoted to fellowship, and dreamed aloud what Acts 2 churches might look like in modern contexts.
  • Devoted to Prayer, Juan Meza: Juan was a former classmate of mine, and serves as the Latino Minister at the Church of Christ at White Station in Memphis. I thought he did a good job discussing how prayer builds our relationship with God, its power, and its purpose. It was all the more impressive to me because he was presenting in a second language!
  • A Dialogue on Two Views of Heaven, Dan Chambers and Ralph Gilmore: This was a discussion on the nature of eternal life: will eternity be spent with God in a spiritual heaven (“up there” somewhere), or will it God come to dwell with His people on a renewed earth (“down here” somewhere)? On the whole, I was disappointed in this. The two men had not shared their notes ahead of time, and I thought this was a mistake as it lead to a disjointed conversation, where Chambers was presenting his perspective on a renewed earth, while Gilmore tried to anticipate Chambers’ arguments and refute them rather than actually present his own perspective on heaven. On the positive side, the two men repeatedly affirmed their love and respect for one another and were adamant that this was not a fellowship issue, or something to be divisive about. I appreciated that.
  • Artifacts and Acts, Part 3: The Flame in Jerusalem, Dale Manor: Dr. Manor is a treasure—a classically-trained archaeologist with a wealth of information about the ancient world, and I try to catch one of his lectures each year. This one focused on some archaeological finds and background information from Corinth, Ephesus, Jerusalem, and Caesarea.
  • This Is Us, Part 3: Spiritual Ancestry of Churches of Christ, Monte Cox: Dr. Cox is another favorite of mine, and I thought he had some good things to say about the history of Churches of Christ and our future. He talked about the early days of the Restoration Movement (focusing on Thomas and Alexander Campbell and Barton W. Stone) and their strong emphasis on unity. In the 20th century, the (unofficial) list of essential doctrines grew longer and longer, and a unity movement became increasingly fractured. He concluded by posing the question: are Churches of Christ in crisis, or are we experiencing a reorientation toward Christ at the center?
  • Boldness In Adversity, Jesse Robertson: Jesse is a New Testament professor at Harding, and also a deacon at Cloverdale (where I work), and is someone I have come to deeply respect and appreciate. He closed out Lectureship on Wednesday by focusing on the boldness that we witness in the Book of Acts: it is something the apostles repeatedly prayed for and then evidenced in their lives. Jesse passionately implored us to pray for courage as we seek to tell the world about Jesus. As he pointed out insightfully: it takes one kind of courage to speak truth to your enemies; it takes another kind of courage to speak truth to your friends.

As always, Lectureship was a blessing for me and I greatly enjoyed it.  I would highly recommend taking part in this next year if you are able!

Imitating the Devil

Introduction

A central Christian teaching is that for those who are in Christ, our lives are spent in the process of sanctification—in conjunction with our own efforts and desires, God’s Spirit works in us to transform our lives into conformity with that of Jesus Christ. In short, we seek to imitate Christ, and the Spirit helps us to do that.

While this is the goal, the sobering reality is that if we aren’t careful, we can find ourselves imitating someone very different—the Devil. That perhaps seems like a sensationalistic claim—what Christians actually set out to imitate the Evil One? By intention, it may not happen, but by action, it happens all too frequently. Let me explain.

Titles, Not Names

It will be surprising to some to hear that the Evil One mentioned in Scripture is nowhere given a name; he is repeatedly given titles and descriptions: the dragon, the serpent, the devil, the father of lies, etc.—even Satan is not a name—in the original language, it is used with a definite article (“the Satan”).[1]

What I think is helpful about realizing that this murky character is only described with titles is that these titles tell us something about his character—a character that Christians can emulate if we are not careful.

The Father of Lies

You are of your father the devil, and your will is to do your father’s desires. He was a murderer from the beginning, and does not stand in the truth, because there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks out of his own character, for he is a liar and the father of lies.

(John 8.44)

This one is pretty obvious: the Evil One is a liar. We see it in his deception of Adam and Even in the Garden, and we see it on a regular basis as he whispers to us that the ways God has laid out for us aren’t really the best ways, or that we are too broken to be loved by our Creator and to be used by Him. He is a liar and the father of lies.

And here is the scary part: when we lie, not only do we fail to imitate Christ, but we are actively imitating the father of lies. Being people of integrity is such a fundamental characteristic of Jesus’ disciples that He specifically addressed it in the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 6.33-37), but we easily resort to being people of evasion, partial truths, and outright dishonesty. When we do this, we may not be intentionally imitating the Devil, but in our lack of careful intention to be people of absolute integrity, we imitate him nonetheless.

The Devil

This one may be less obvious to us because we tend to associate devil with a red creature with horns and a pitchfork, but really, the Greek word that is translated devil is διαβολος (from which we get our word diabolical), which means “the slanderer.” Obviously, this term is also related to the notion of dishonesty, but slander is more specific. Slander is “the utterance of false charges or misrepresentations which defame and damage another’s reputation.”[2]

Interestingly, this same word is used in Scripture to describe people:

Their wives likewise must be dignified, not slanderers, but sober-minded, faithful in all things.

1 Timothy 3.11

But understand this, that in the last days there will come times of difficulty. For people will be lovers of self, lovers of money, proud, arrogant, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, heartless, unappeasable, slanderous, without self-control, brutal, not loving good, treacherous, reckless, swollen with conceit, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, having the appearance of godliness, but denying its power. Avoid such people.

2 Timothy 3.1-5

Depending on translation, this Greek word can be rendered as “slanderers” or “malicious gossips,” but the basic idea is clear enough: talking bad about people is diabolical. The Evil One is a slanderer. He is the Devil.

And here is the scary part: when we slander, when we talk badly or share untrue statements about people, we do not imitate Christ, but we are actively imitating the Devil. Being people who consistently speak in God-honoring ways is a huge challenge for followers of Jesus, and Scripture is full of admonitions regarding how we use our tongues and words (Ephesians 4.15; Colossians 4.6; James 3.6). This does not mean that we can never say anything negative about another person, but I do think it means that we should refrain from saying things about people that we wouldn’t say to them, that we should make sure that what we say is true, and that we should make sure that what we say is said in love. 

The Satan

This one may be the hardest of all for us to see initially, because we are so used to thinking of Satan as a name. But it is actually a title. Ha satan (הַשָּׂטָן) literally means “the adversary” or “the accuser”. It can be used in a general sense:

And the LORD raised up an adversary against Solomon, Hadad the Edomite.

(1 Kings 11.14a)

The Angel of Yahweh is referred to this way:

But God’s anger was kindled because he went, and the angel of the LORD took his stand in the way as his adversary.

(Numbers 22.22a)

But when the term is used with the definite article (“the”) before it, it specifically refers to the rebellious spiritual being who has set himself in opposition to the will of God. This is how he is described at the beginning of the Book of Job, as he brings the case of Job before God and stands as an adversary against Job, accusing him of possessing a love for God that is shallow and deficient. We see a similar characterization in the Book of Revelation, where the evil creature variously described as the great dragon, the ancient serpent, the devil and Satan hurls accusations against God’s people day and night (Revelation 12.9-10). The Evil One is an adversary of God’s people, who lobs accusations against them.

And here is the scary part: when we oppose and accuse God’s people, we are not imitating Christ, but rather, are actively imitating the Satan. This is challenging for me. There are a lot of believers who are different than I am in various ways. Some of these differences are significant, and at times it is tempting for me to magnify the differences and question the hearts and motive of people with whom I disagree. But this is dangerous spiritual ground to occupy. I am sometimes humbled by the words of Jesus in Mark 9.40: “For the one who is not against us is for us.” I struggle at times to know how to apply these words, but I know that my perspective is often closer to that of the disciples than Jesus. And I know that I don’t want to be an accuser or adversary of God’s people. I don’t want to imitate the Satan.

Conclusion

This has not been an exhaustive post—there are other titles of the Evil One (like, for example, “Evil One”!) that we could look at, but I think the general point has been established. Rather than talking about an evil figure named Satan, Scripture uses lots of titles to describe this character. These descriptions let us know what he is like and what his motives are, and should also provide conviction for us that, if we are not careful, we can in a very real sense imitate the Father of Lies, the Devil, the Satan. For those of us who are instead called to be imitators of Christ, this obviously will not do.

Father of mercies,

Forgive us our sins and shortcomings.

May your Spirit,

Day by day,

Transform us into the image of your Son, Jesus Christ.

Amen.


[1] I don’t have issues with people using Satan as a name; I am just pointing out that this is not a name in Greek or Hebrew, and is not how biblical authors used it.

[2] https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/slander

Self-Denial in a Self-Discovery World

One of the advantages of being a youth minister is that I have the opportunity to read and hear a lot of good teaching from a variety of different sources. Some of these are basically available to anyone (books, sermons, podcasts), while others I gain access to by traveling to different youth events and hearing gifted and thoughtful speakers.

A while back, I was blessed to listen to my friend Shannon Cooper, who made the point that we live in a society that is obsessed with self-discovery: for many, the central goal of life is to “find out who we are” so we can “be true to ourselves.” Self-help books constitute a lucrative industry. Discussions related to sexual and gender identity become issues of the utmost importance. We seek to define ourselves by our hobbies, or the music we listen to, or our peer groups.

There is a problem with this, though: self-discovery leaves us with no point of reference beyond ourselves. Fundamentally, it is limited, subjective, and, ultimately…selfish.

It is also not Christian. A more Christian way of thinking about identity is not based on self-discovery, but on self-denial and the imitation of Jesus.

And whoever does not take his cross and follow Me is not worthy of Me. Whoever finds his life will lose it, and whoever loses his life for My sake will find it.

(Matthew 10.38-39)

Then Jesus told his disciples, “If anyone would come after Me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow Me.”

(Matthew 16.24)

Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ.

(1 Corinthians 11.1)

 I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.

(Galatians 2.20)

As Christians, we cannot force our worldview on nonbelievers (nor should we try to), but we should certainly hold ourselves and one another to that worldview. And the way of Christ is not about finding purpose and meaning through discovering “who we really are,” which is another way of saying “doing what we want to do.” Rather, it is about denying the urge to do what we want to do and instead to prioritize what Jesus wants us to do in partnering in His work to reconcile the world to Himself. This is where purpose and meaning is found.

Jeroboam and the Lure of Political Power

The Story of Jeroboam

Jeroboam is one of the Bible’s incredibly tragic characters. He was a man who God granted an amazing opportunity, and he squandered it away. 

Jeroboam’s story begins with King Solomon, who himself was a tragic character: a man who was given wisdom, power, and great wealth by God, but who turned away from God and began to worship other gods (1 Kings 11.1-8). Because of this, God ultimately determines to divide the kingdom of Israel in the days of Rehoboam, Solomon’s son. Rehoboam remains king over two tribes in the south (creating the Southern Kingdom of Judah), while Jeroboam is established as king over the remaining ten tribes (creating the Northern Kingdom of Israel).

The story is absolutely clear that God, in His grace, has offered a covenant agreement to Jeroboam: God will bless him, make him king over Israel, and give Him all that he desires if he will listen to God’s commands and walk in His ways like David did. And moreover, God promises to build Jeroboam a house or a dynasty like He did for David. 

Jeroboam’s rise to power was the work of God’s providential hand, and Jeroboam knew this. And yet, as soon as he sits down on the throne, Jeroboam’s thinking seems to shift from providential to pragmatic: the question Jeroboam asks himself is, “What do I need to do to stay in power?” 

Ironically, Jeroboam already had the answer—God had told him he simply needed to listen to God’s commands and walk in His ways as David did, but Jeroboam ignores that answer and pursues his own plans instead.

After some initial efforts to fortify some of his cities, Jeroboam makes his big mistake. He reasons that if the citizens of the Northern Kingdom return to the Jerusalem Temple (in the Southern Kingdom) to offer sacrifices as they are supposed to, it will draw their hearts back to Rehoboam king of Judah, and then they won’t want to follow Jeroboam anymore, and will overthrow him and return to Rehoboam and Judah. So Jeroboam gets what he thinks is a brilliant idea, and he makes two golden calves; he sets one up in Dan and another in Bethel, representing the northern and southern borders of the territory of the Northern Kingdom.

Scholars debate whether Jeroboam is trying to get the Israelites to worship another god by doing this, or, rather, if he is simply introducing an innovation in the way in which they worship Jehovah/Yahweh. I tend to think it is the latter, but calves are so closely related with Canaanite pagan religion that it is hard to be sure.

Either way, it doesn’t really matter. Even if Jeroboam was not setting up worship of a new god (and thus not violating the first commandment),  he was still guilty of creating an image to serve as a symbol of God (which violates the second commandment). So at the very least, he perverted the worship of the true God. Jeroboam’s disregard for the religious statues that God had set up did not stop there, as he also created alternate worship sites on high places at Dan and Bethel, put in place non-Levitical priests, and instituted his own feast day. These actions broke God’s commandments, and also revealed Jeroboam’s feelings that civil matters were more important than religious conviction.

Jeroboam has not been on the throne for long, but already he has dramatically departed from God’s instruction to walk in all His ways as David did. Instead, Jeroboam seems to have forgotten Who placed him on the throne in the first place, and rather than obey the real Power behind the throne, takes matters into his own hands to secure his position by his own power.

In 1 Kings 13, a prophet comes from God and condemns what Jeroboam has done, also predicting that judgment will come upon him because of it:

O altar, altar, thus says the LORD: “Behold, a son shall be born to the house of David, Josiah by name, and he shall sacrifice on you the priests of the high places who make offerings on you, and human bones shall be burned on you.” And he gave a sign the same day, saying, “This is the sign that the LORD has spoken: ‘Behold, the altar shall be torn down, and the ashes that are on it shall be poured out.’”

(1 Kings 13.2-3)

Not surprisingly, Jeroboam isn’t a big fan of this message and stretches out his hand: “Seize him!” But as soon as this happens, his hand “dried up, so that he could not draw it back to himself” (1 Kings 13.4). Ironically, in this very act, Jeroboam actually gives credibility to the prophecy—clearly, there is some power behind it because Jeroboam’s hand shrivels up, and furthermore, the altar was torn down as the prophecy said. Jeroboam asks the prophet to entreat God for him that his hand might be restored, and the prophet does so, and Jeroboam is healed.

Jeroboam is probably grateful to the man of God for his healing, and invites him to dine with him, but the prophet refuses because God had commanded him to return directly after his mission was completed. It is possible that dining with the king would have made the prophet appear to approve of the religious apostasy that Jeroboam was promoting.

Here, the narrative takes leave of Jeroboam and follows the young prophet and his strange interaction with an old prophet from Bethel. Since our focus is on Jeroboam we won’t dwell on this, but it is a tragic story of the young prophet from Judah being deceived by the older prophet from Israel, disobeying God, and dying as a result. This may seem like strange information to include in an extended narrative on the reign of Jeroboam, but it reinforces the idea that God expects to be obeyed, and severe consequences fall upon those who refuse to do so.

Regardless of this cautionary tale, 1 Kings 13 ends by saying:

After this thing Jeroboam did not turn from his evil way, but made priests for the high places again from among all the people. Any who would, he ordained to be priests of the high places. And this thing became sin to the house of Jeroboam, so as to cut it off and to destroy it from the face of the earth.

(1 Kings 13.33-34)

So this story also shows us that Jeroboam remains unrepentant—he is determined to continue his disobedience to God. 

The rest of Jeroboam’s reign isn’t very happy. His son grows sick, and when he enquires of a prophet of God to determine if his sone will recover, he learns that not only will his son die, but because Jeroboam had incited the wrath of heaven by leading the Northern Kingdom into idolatry instead of being faithful to the covenant God had offered him, judgment had been pronounced not just on Jeroboam, but on every male from his house—the line of Jeroboam will be wiped out.

We also know that he was a man of war, and that he warred constantly with Rehoboam, and also fought against Rehoboam’s son, Abijam/Abijah and was defeated by him (2 Chronicles 13) and never recovered the level of power he had previously had. 

And that is basically what we know about Jeroboam.

Sacrificing Principle for Political Gain

Jeroboam is one of the truly tragic characters of Scripture. His legacy is that he is the man who “made Israel to sin”—this lamentable epitaph is mentioned over 20 times in Scripture, and his sinfulness really summarizes the entire period of the Divided Kingdom. I think there are a lot of things we can learn from the sad story of Jeroboam, but I want to focus on just one that I believe is particularly relevant for a lot of people today.

Jeroboam’s blessing, security, and power rested in his obedience to God. Instead of trusting in God, however, he chose to do the pragmatic thing. He made religious changes for political reasons, thinking that this would ensure his longevity as king. Instead, it led to the downfall of his kingdom. Jeroboam’s power and position rested on his faithfulness, not his politics. 

If there is a lesson that I think American Christians need to hear in 2019—a time of rampant political division and rabid political devotion—it might be this one: political power is not the means by which Christians are called to change the world. 

As most of my readers know, I am a part of Churches of Christ, which find historical roots in the American Restoration Movement. Our heritage has an interesting and diverse relationship with politics. Some Restorationist voices were highly involved in politics: Alexander Campbell, one of the key early leaders in the movement, served as a member of the Virginia Constitutional Convention in 1829-30. James A. Garfield, 20th President of the United States, was a Restoration Movement preacher. 

Others had a much different view of politics. David Lipscomb, the longtime Gospel Advocate editor and a major leader in Churches of Christ in the decades following the Civil War, was avowedly apolitical. He was a pacifist who didn’t think Christians should serve in the military or even vote. J.N. Armstrong, the first President of Harding College, was strongly influenced by Lipscomb and had similar views.

 

I take this brief historical detour as a way of saying that I think that, in the spirit of Romans 14, the Christian’s relationship to politics is one of those areas where we are to do our best to follow the teachings and ethics of Jesus and be careful not to judge the scruples of others. 

Having said that, when it comes to politics, let us never sacrifice principle for political expediency.

In the crisis of the moment, it might seem like a good thing to do, but as Jeroboam learned, it never pays off. I think Jeroboam’s disobedience was largely motivated by fear—he was afraid of what would happen if he let the people go to Judah to worship, so out of his fear, he made a politically expedient decision. 

We live in an environment where political fervor always seems to be at a fever pitch. If we aren’t focused on a current or coming election, we are enamored with the latest political scandal or partisan feud.

In the last Presidential election, I heard a lot of fear from Christians (regardless of their political views) about what was going to happen. Speaking for myself (again, in the spirit of Romans 14, I am not placing judgment on those who disagree), I found myself unable to vote for either major party candidate. Both candidates had been in the public eye for a long time, and I knew plenty about the kind of people they were and the sort of character they had, and I didn’t feel like I could vote for either one. What really bothered me, though, was how often I was told or read from other Christians who supported one candidate or the other (because I got this from both sides of the aisle), that I basically needed to ignore my principles and vote for the “lesser of two evils” (whoever that may have been depending on the person I was talking to at the time), with the implication being that if I didn’t, our next President would likely bring about the end of the world.

You know, I don’t care who you vote for, but it does bother me:

  • When Christians encourage others to choose the lesser evil…because we aren’t supposed to choose evil in greater or lesser varieties!
  • When Christians encourage others to ignore their principles…because we aren’t supposed to ignore our principles!
  • When Christians suggest that the future hinges upon some human ruler…because God is the one who is in charge! When Pharaoh ruled the world, God freed His people from Egypt! When Nebuchadnezzar ruled the world, God saved three Hebrew teenagers from a fiery death! When Nero ruled the world, God orchestrated the greatest growth in the history of the church!

It is up to you to choose what your relationship with politics will be, and in my personal opinion, our political voice is an opportunity that we have to glorify God. However, let us never make the mistake of thinking that political power is the means by which Christians are called to change the world, or that it is acceptable for us to sacrifice our principles for the sake of political expediency.

The lure of political power is strong, and it can easily deceive us into thinking that the ends justify the means. But as Jeroboam learned, they do not. 

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