The online journal of Luke Dockery

Tag: Racism (Page 1 of 3)

Readings on Racism

Over the last year and a half, I have done quite a bit of reading to help me better understand our current racial situation in the United States and some of the history that lies behind it. Of course, I have not read everything and, indeed, there are a few specific books that I still have intentions of reading, but I have read enough that: (1) I feel like my grasp of the situation is far better than it was previously, and (2) I feel confident making a few recommendations.

Though I hope these recommendations are beneficial for anyone, they are intended for a specific group: Christians who believe in the equality of all people and thus, deplore racism, but who also are uncertain or skeptical of the existence of “systemic” or “structural” racism. I suspect that many of my readers fall into this category, and so I am specifically recommending the three books below, because I used to fit into that category myself, and these books were very helpful in shaping my own views.[1]

Rather than write a full-on review, I will simply introduce each book and share why I found it to be helpful.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindnessby Michelle Alexander: This is not a fun read. On the contrary, it was devastating. Alexander lays out, in detail, how the American criminal justice system disproportionately punishes people of color in a variety of ways (ways that are certainly tied to socio-economic status, but which cannot be completely explained by social class). This is a helpful book to begin to understand a particular aspect of systemic racism and the way that it has creatively adapted throughout our nation’s history: when slavery was abolished, Jim Crow segregation took its place. When segregation was outlawed, mass incarceration took its place.

The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America, by Richard Rothstein: in many ways, I felt this was The New Jim Crow applied to the housing industry in the United States. It talks about all sorts of creative ways in which government officials—at the federal, state, and local levels—orchestrated the largely segregated society that still exists today in our country (zoning ordinances, neighborhood covenants, blockbusting, white flight, establishment of ghettos, construction of interstates, and more). The Color of Law shares tons of data and statistics, but is written in a narrative style that is easy to follow and understand.

The Color of Compromise: the Truth About the American Church’s Complicity in Racism, by Jemar Tisby: this book specifically addresses the American Church, and confronts the reader with the uncomfortable reality that throughout American history, white Christians have largely (though not entirely) turned a blind eye toward racism, and many times have actively supported and furthered racist agendas. Tisby does not shy away from hard truths, but he writes with clear affection for the church, and offers helpful suggestions moving forward.


This is an admittedly short list, and certainly there are a host of other helpful resources out there. I wanted to keep the list short, because I always find it overwhelming when someone suggests a list of a dozen must-read books. Most people simply do not have the time to do so. Three books is a much more manageable number. But also, I specifically include these books for a few reasons:

  • They tend to be more objective than subjective, based on historical data, research studies, and specific policies than personal perception or anecdotes (there is nothing wrong with the latter, but I think the former tends to be more convincing to a skeptical crowd).
  • They are not based on white guilt, but they do suggest a collective responsibility. It does not make sense for people to feel guilty about things entirely out of their control, but it certainly makes sense to take stock of the situation we all find ourselves in and do the best we can to improve it.
  • They do not promote the sense of paternalistic white saviorism that I have sensed from some who are seeking to respond to racial inequities.[2]

These books were really helpful for me; I hope they are for you!


[1]  When I say that I “used to” fit into that category, I am not suggesting that my devotion to Christ or my rejection of racism has changed (far from it!), but merely indicating that where I was once somewhat ambivalent about the reality of systemic racism in contemporary times, I am now firmly convinced of it.

How to go about addressing that reality is an issue for another time, but until we acknowledge the existence of a problem, we can’t do anything to address it.

[2] I am hardly the first one to pick up on this tone. I think it comes from a sincere desire to help (“we (white people) made this mess, and it is up to us to fix it!”), but it easily becomes patronizing (“we know what is best for you; step aside and let us come make your lives better”) and denies people of color of agency and dignity.

Scattered Reflections on Race-related Issues

Like many people, I have been distressed by so many aspects of the race-related incidents that have been erupting all over the nation:

  • The tragic and unjust deaths of African Americans, whether at the hands of overreaching and brutal law enforcement officers or racist vigilantes
  • The protests in response to these outrageous acts that have, at times, turned violent  (and seemingly, at times have been coopted and corrupted by outside influences)
  • In some places, the brutal and violent responses by police officers to even peaceful protests
  • The very poor handling of the entire situation by President Trump whose rhetoric only escalates the tensions
  • The negative attention received by countless law enforcement officers across the country who seek to serve and protect and want to be a part of the solution rather than the problem

Though I am deeply convicted by what I have seen and heard, I am always uncertain about how to respond, at least, in a public proclamatory way such as this. On the one hand, as a middle-class white guy in a largely-white context, I don’t presume to be an expert in such matters, and I have been doing my best to listen rather than to speak. Furthermore, I am not interested in virtue signaling, which can seem like an easy practice that doesn’t actually accomplish or help anything.

On the other hand, I have seen and heard from many black friends and acquaintances about how painful it is when white people (especially Christians) maintain silence, and how supported and loved they feel when people such as myself speak out in solidarity instead. So, that’s what this post is, in a disorganized sort of way.

Foundational Issues

As a Christian, there are two fundamental ideas that guide my thoughts on race before anything else:

  1. All humans are created in the image of God. This conveys the notion of being God’s representatives on earth, tasked with carrying out His will (we see this in Genesis 1-2). Unfortunately, due to sin, humans fail to properly reflect the image of God, but that doesn’t change the God-appointed identity given to each and every human. We are equal. This is antithetical to the notion and practice of racism.
  2. Jesus said that the greatest commandment is to love God with everything we have, and the second is to love our neighbors as ourselves. Loving my neighbor is also antithetical to the notion and practice of racism. Beyond that, loving my neighbor compels me to try to see things from my neighbor’s perspective, and appreciate that his/her experiences may be different from my own.

Personal Repentance

My position is a fairly simple one: I think we have massive racial issues in our country. I think we come by those issues honestly because they are an original part of our national DNA, and I think that the solution to the problem is challenging and will never fully be realized until Jesus returns (more on that below). But the solution must start with me. Here is a statement made by a (white) minister friend of mine, which exactly echoes my own sentiments:

I don’t like the phrase “there’s not a racist bone in my body.” Because if I’m being honest with myself, I am inclined to judge a man by the color of his skin. Just because I don’t like that part of me doesn’t mean it’s not in there. The recent unjust killings of black folks in our country shouldn’t only cause us to point fingers at the perpetrators, though we should demand justice. These killings should also cause us to lift the hoods of our hearts to see the racism that might be lurking there. My goal as a Christian is not to deny my prejudice but to repent of it. The God I worship seeks to bring people of all colors into His kingdom, to make us all children of Abraham through faith in Christ. So I must turn my racist bone over to God so He can renovate my heart. True change in our churches and systems and nation starts with my willingness to say, “Lord, change this wicked way in me.”

Personal repentance must be my first response.

Systemic Racism

Here is a definition of systemic (or, institutional) racism from an excellent article by David French (I will discuss this article further below):

A system in which public policies, institutional practices, cultural representations, and other norms work in various, often reinforcing ways to perpetuate racial group inequity. It identifies dimensions of our history and culture that have allowed privileges associated with “whiteness” and disadvantages associated with “color” to endure and adapt over time. Structural racism is not something that a few people or institutions choose to practice. Instead it has been a feature of the social, economic and political systems in which we all exist.

This is a hotly-debated topic (along with the corresponding idea of white privilege), and I don’t really intend to get into it in this post, but based on my reading and listening to the perspectives of black friends and acquaintances, it seems clear to me that this sort of racism exists in this country. We could debate how and where we see it and how intentional it is in its various manifestations, but it exists.

If that statement upsets you or makes you defensive, but you are open to having your perspective changed, I would recommend Michelle Alexander’s, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of ColorblindnessI read this book last year, and it was one of my top books of 2019, but let’s be clear: I did not enjoy reading it at all. It was a punch in the gut. But it was meticulously researched and footnoted, and it clearly established (to my mind, at least) one aspect of systemic racism.

I also recommend David French’s wonderful article that I referenced above: “American Racism: We’ve Got So Very Far To Go”. French is a thoughtful, conservative commentator, and shares his own journey in coming to terms with the immensity of the racial problem in the US. This is a calm, even-handed, and reflective piece, and I like the simple way he handles systemic racism as a logical progression (emphasis added by me):

  1. Slavery was legal and defended morally and (ultimately) militarily from 1619 to 1865.

  2. After slavery, racial discrimination was lawful and defended morally (and often violently) from 1865 to 1964.
  3. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 did not end illegal discrimination or racism, it mainly gave black Americans the legal tools to fight back against legal injustices.
  4. It is unreasonable to believe that social structures and cultural attitudes that were constructed over a period of 345 years will disappear in 56.
  5. Moreover, the consequences of 345 years of legal and cultural discrimination, are going to be dire, deep-seated, complex, and extraordinarily difficult to comprehensively ameliorate.

Black Lives Matter

There are specific groups that use the “Black Lives Matter” slogan that have detailed ideologies, portions of which I disagree with (I am decidedly not a Marxist, for example). But “Black Lives Matter” as a slogan is completely true and I have no issues with it. Frankly, I have a hard time understanding those who do. From the beginning, to anyone who is listening, it is clear that the slogan means “Black Lives Matter too” rather than “only Black Lives Matter.”

“Black Lives Matter” is a true statement. It doesn’t need qualification (Here is a thoughtful article, written from a Christian perspective,  on that very idea.)

Colorblind

I was raised at a time when I think it was a popular idea to promote “colorblindness” as the solution to racism, and you hear these notions a lot today: “I don’t see people in color! We are all the same! There’s only one race; the human race.”

I think these statements generally come from very well-meaning people who truly wish that racism wasn’t a problem, but I think they are problematic. From a theological perspective, God clearly appreciates diversity, because it is what He created! The story of the Old Testament is the promise of God to save all peoples of the earth through Abraham and his descendants, and in the New Testament, we see this become a reality as people from all points of the globe become part of God’s multi-ethnic family. So much of the New Testament writings reflect the tension between Jews and Gentiles, and the answer isn’t a colorblind approach that pretends no differences exists or that forces one group to become just like the other, but for different parts of the body to learn to live in unity with one another! This same idea is what is portrayed in beautiful and vivid language in the Book of Revelation:

After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice, “Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!”

(Revelation 7.9-10)

Furthermore, I think “colorblind” perspectives are also problematic because they fall short of loving our neighbors. Part of loving our neighbors is trying to understand them and what it is like to walk in their shoes. It is to sympathize with their struggles and support them in those struggles. I don’t see how we can do that while doggedly insisting that we don’t see color and failing to appreciate the way in which color shapes who we are and what we experience.

On this topic, I found a comment from another friend to be particularly helpful:

As a Native American man, I get nervous when I hear people say they don’t see color. In essence you are saying you don’t see the beauty and diversity of God’s creation. The Psalmist says that “we are fearfully and wonderfully made” (Psalm 139.14). The problem is not that we see differences—for God made us all intentionally and unique from one another. The problem arises when we conclude others are lesser because of those differences.

Notice different skin colors.

Observe the beauty of other cultures.

Admire different languages.

Then praise God for His creativity and love.

“…Brown and yellow, black and white – they are precious in His sight. Jesus loves the little children of the world.”

Calls For Patience

Sometimes, well-meaning but truly oblivious people wonder why there is such an urgency to deal with this now. Why all the protests? Why the frustration? Why the violence? Instead, the suggestion is made, wouldn’t it be preferable to be patient and work for the change that you want to see?

Well, I certainly don’t approve of violence, but I wonder, just how patient can you expect people to be?

At times, it seems to me that we (as a society) ask African Americans to have superhuman amounts of forgiveness and patience: forgiveness for the inhumane ways they have been treated in the past (and continue to be treated), and patience as they wait for things to get better. Not only is this unfair, it is also highly ironic, considering the fact that, historically in the US, African Americans have been treated as subhuman. This is an undeniable fact, from the practice of slavery, to the 3/5 Compromise, to the practice of segregation, and more.

The following words from Langston Hughes touch on this, and are both prophetic and haunting:

Negroes
Sweet and docile,
Meek, humble, and kind:
Beware the day
They change their minds!

Wind
In the cotton fields,
Gentle breeze:
Beware the hour
It uproots trees!

The reality is that it has been far too long, and we are reaping the consequences of that reality.

The Solution to the Problem

I don’t actually think that the problem of racism will be solved until Jesus returns, because ultimately, it is one of the many consequences of sin that plagues the broken world in which we live. That does not mean that I think we should do nothing about it and just wait until Jesus returns to sort it all out. On the contrary, I think the sin in my own life will continue to be a problem until I die or until Jesus returns, but identifying that sin and repenting of it is a major concern of mine!

So, to be clear, I am in favor of efforts to root out racism and bring about reconciliation and equality in our society. It is my hope that recents events will lead to change in that direction.

Having said that, as a Christian,  I don’t believe that the primary way in which I am called to change the world is through the political process. Rather, it is being salt and light, living as a citizen of God’s kingdom, and being an agent of new creation in an old and dying world. This may sound naive (“Christians have excused and supported racism in all sorts of ways over the years!”), but I don’t think this is naive at all: if each and every person in the world who names Jesus as Lord actually lived according to the kingdom principles Jesus established, then the world would be radically different.

Ultimately, this will be the solution to racism. When Jesus returns, and God’s will is done on earth as it is in heaven, then racism and every other form of sin will be a thing of the past. In the meantime, the best thing I can do is to allow God’s Spirit to transform my life and bring it in line with the character of Christ.

If all Christians, by God’s grace, were to do that, imagine the leavening influence that could have in our families…and our churches…and our communities…and our world.

Lord, have mercy. And come quickly.


Additional Resources to Consider:

“Racial Turmoil in America: A Biblical Response”

“A Christian Response to George Floyd’s Death in Minnesota”

Strife and Contention: A Message from Habakkuk

O Lord, how long shall I cry for help, and you will not hear?

Or cry to you “Violence!” and you will not save?

Why do you make me see iniquity, and why do you idly look at wrong?

Destruction and violence are before me; strife and contention arise.

So the law is paralyzed, and justice never goes forth.

For the wicked surround the righteous; so justice goes forth perverted.”

(Habakkuk 1.2-4, ESV)

Tucked away near the end of the Old Testament is the Book of Habakkuk. Habakkuk appears as a prophet who speaks to God for the people, rather than a prophet who speaks for God to the people. Habakkuk voices his lament—his call of frustration and despair—to God, on behalf of his people.

We don’t know much about Habakkuk. We know he lived and worked during the reign of the wicked King Jehoiakim in the last days of the kingdom of Judah. Judah had prospered during the reign of the righteous King Josiah, but Josiah was killed in battle, and his son Jehoiakim did not follow in his footsteps.

Instead, Jehoiakim was one of the most godless, selfish, and tyrannical kings ever to rule over Judah. We can actually learn quite a bit about Jehoiakim’s reign from the Book of Jeremiah, as Jeremiah also prophesied in Judah at this time. From that book, we know that Jehoiakim’s reign was characterized by violence and injustice (Jeremiah 22.13-17). People were not treated fairly and the wealthy took advantage of those who were less fortunate. We also know that Jehoiakim was antagonistic toward God’s prophets who tried to direct him to a better path. Jehoiakim ordered the death of the prophet Uriah (Jeremiah 20.20-24) and refused to listen to the warnings of Jeremiah, even burning one of his scrolls (Jeremiah 36).

The Book of Habakkuk dates to approximately 610-605 B.C. Around this time, Nebuchadnezzar had defeated the combined forces of Egypt and Assyria at the Battle of Carchemesh and asserted Babylon as the dominant world power. The threat of Babylon lay like a shadow over the land of Palestine.

And it is in this context that the prophet Habakkuk speaks out. In agony, Habakkuk looked around at a struggling and imperfect world filled with heartbreak and suffering and violence and injustice and he cried out, “Don’t you care, Lord? Why do You let this go on?”

Yahweh was the God who made a covenant with Abraham and his descendants and who taught them what justice and righteousness was, and it is to Him who Habakkuk cries out because of the injustice and unrighteousness he saw surrounding him. As he struggled to make sense of it all, he lamented to God.

• • •

With a little reflection, I think we can see how Habakkuk’s ancient questions are also modern questions which are very relevant to us.

The stories on the news unsettle us. They remind us not of how far we have come, but of how far we still have to go. They remind us of a great racial divide that exists in our country between black and white.

The stories are not the same, but they have similarities: black men dying at the hands of white police officers following some sort of run-in with the law. Sometimes those officers are not indicted for their actions, and unhappy citizens take to the streets and protests and riots occur. We have heard the names of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Walter Scott, and Freddie Gray. We have seen the footage of protests in places like New York City and South Carolina, and riots in Ferguson and Baltimore.

I claim neither the knowledge of the facts of these specific cases nor the sufficient wisdom to know whose fault it was in each case, or where or how much blame should be placed. It is hard for me to know if justice has been served or not.

It is a delicate situation:

  • I don’t want to condemn police officers. Law enforcement officials fulfill a vital role in our society, and the vast majority of them selflessly do a good job. That doesn’t change the fact, however, that we clearly have some officers who exercise very poor judgment with tragic results.
  • I don’t want to excuse the behavior of those who, when confronted by an officer, resist arrest or run away or attempt to fight back. Neither do I believe, though, that such behavior should merit an immediate death sentence.
  • I don’t want to excuse violent protests and rioting in the streets. Neither do I want to suggest that there is nothing to protest and be upset about.

Regardless of whether or not justice was served in these individual cases, I do know that injustice exists in our country. I know that African Americans are incarcerated in this country at a much higher rate than Caucasians. I know that African Americans are more likely to experience poverty, and that there is a high correlation between poverty and crime. Thus, African Americans are also more likely to be involved in and to be victims of violent crime than are their white counterparts. That is unjust.

Further, I know that many black people have no trust in this nation’s justice system, nor in the officers who are supposed to uphold the laws of this country and protect its citizens. The statistics suggest that there is some reason to be concerned about this, and yet, I also know that there are many white people who refuse to even consider that there might be some validity to these concerns and conclusions.

And I know that in many environments, whether on talk shows, or social media, or in churches, or amongst friends, we are unable to even discuss these issues in a productive fashion because the divide is so great.

And in the midst of it all, I don’t know what to do other than to cry out to God, with language similar to Habakkuk’s…

Violence abounds in our society, in our world. It seems that destruction and violence are ever before us. When we cry “Violence!”, God, why do you not save?

The very systems we put in place to uphold order and limit violence seem to fail us. At times, it seems that the law is, in fact, paralyzed, and that justice never goes forth. Instead, justice is perverted.

• • •

God responds to Habbakuk. He doesn’t rebuke Habakkuk for his questions or frustrations. God is bigger than our emotions or our questions; He desires that we bring these before Him.

But God does respond (Habakkuk 1.5-11). Indeed, God is aware of all that is going on. He has seen the injustice and oppression, and He is going to act: He will use the Babylonians to punish Judah for their wickedness.

This revelation prompts additional lament from Habakkuk, who doesn’t understand why God would punish evil Judah with the even-more-evil Babylonians (Habakkuk 1.12-2.1). Those who were to be punished were more righteous than the ones who were to do the punishing!

God assures Habakkuk that He is in control of these events, and that the Babylonians will also be punished in time (Habakkuk 2.2-20).

The Book of Habakkuk concludes with a prayer of Habakkuk’s confident trust in God (Habakkuk 3.1-19). He has unburdened his heart and turned his doubts and fears over to God, he has heard God’s response, and now he expresses confidence that God will act, and bring about what is best.

• • •

While there are no easy answers, the Book of Habakkuk helps us to think more clearly about the problems and injustices in our own society.

(1) As we look around and see these heartbreaking tragedies and we are reminded of the inequities of our society, we cannot claim specific knowledge for why God allows these things to continue. But Habakkuk reminds us that God sees these things, and that He is sovereign over them. As people of faith, we trust in that sovereignty. We know that God is in control of the world, and that He works in all situations—even terrible ones—to bring about His good purposes.

(2) Also, Habakkuk and the other Old Testament prophets remind us to consider our own place in society: If destruction and violence are all around us, to what degree do we allow those things to continue? If the law is paralyzed and justice never goes forth, to what degree are we responsible for that paralysis and injustice? In the words of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, “Silence in the face of evil is itself evil: God will not hold us guiltless. Not to speak is to speak. Not to act is to act.” If the evidence suggests that an entire subset of our population is suffering injustice and we, in our privilege, refuse to work to address the problem or even acknowledge that there is a problem, we become complicit in it.

(3) And finally, Habakkuk reminds us of the appropriateness of lament. It is right for us to be distressed, and to bring that distress before God. In His sovereignty, He is the one who can do something about it. And while we lament, we yearn for a day when justice will roll down like waters, righteousness like an ever-flowing stream, and when God shall wipe every tear from our eyes.

Larry Doby and the Importance of Forgettable Excellence

1951 Bowman Larry Doby

Over the years, I’ve written a lot on this blog about Jackie Robinson, who has long been one of my heroes. In 1947, Robinson broke Major League Baseball’s color barrier, making it possible for African Americans to play big league baseball, and actually making baseball what it had long claimed to be—the national pastime.

Robinson was a great baseball player, and was the perfect choice as the pioneer who would integrate baseball. He was determined to succeed on the field, and his considerable skills helped. He was a good line drive hitter, a versatile fielder, and an absolute terror with his legs. His daring maneuvers on the base paths thrilled fans, and brought a new style of playing to the conservative Major League circuit. He was great off the field as well: good-looking, articulate, and poised. 

But probably, you know a lot about Jackie Robinson already, because he has gotten a lot of fanfare over the years.

You might not know as much about Larry Doby.

Larry Doby was Jackie Robinson’s American League counterpart. In July 1947, Doby broke the color barrier in the AL when he cracked the lineup for the Cleveland Indians for the first time. In his first appearance he struck out, but he would go on to have a great career of his own as a 7-time All-Star and an eventual Hall of Famer. By some measurements, he even had a better career than Robinson did.

But Robinson came first; Doby was only second. Robinson was the flashier player; Doby was more in the background. Robinson has become an honored figure, a hero to millions; Doby has been forgotten by most people.

So it goes.

But I guess the point I want to make in this post is how incredibly important the Larry Dobys of the world are. As great as Jackie Robinson was, if Larry Doby and a bunch of other African American players behind him weren’t ready to come in and prove that Robinson wasn’t a fluke, it all would have been for nothing. A lot of those players have been forgotten, but their impact and legacy lives on.

And I think about the example of Larry Doby and how it applies to other areas of life, and especially to God’s Kingdom, because when you think about all the parts of Christ’s Body, not too many people get to be Jackie Robinson. Certainly, there are a few—immensely talented, flashy, charismatic, known and admired and remembered by all—but not many.

On the other hand, there are a lot of Larry Dobys—talented in their own right, but not as flashy, not as well-known. Just committed disciples who live lives of dogged, forgettable excellence for the cause of Christ. And who change the world in the process.

Praise God for the Larry Dobys!

The Fall of Man and the Sociological Consequences of Sin

Aftermath of Boston Marathon bombing.

In our continuing discussion of the Fall of Man in Genesis 3 and the widespread devastation of sin, we have already covered the theological and personal consequences of Adam and Eve’s misdeed; in this post we turn to the sociological fallout of that sin, or the way that sin affects our relationships with one another.
Returning to our text, we can see this dimension clearly played out in verses 11-13:

“[God] said, ‘Who told you that you were naked? Have you eaten of the tree of which I commanded you not to eat?’ The man said, ‘The woman whom you gave to be with me, she gave me fruit of the tree, and I ate.’ Then the Lord God said to the woman, ‘What is this that you have done?’ The woman said, ‘The serpent deceived me, and I ate.’”

People were created to live in community with one another. Specifically, Eve was created to be the perfect partner for Adam (Genesis 2.18-25). But when God confronts Adam and Eve with their sin, something very significant (and unfortunate) happens: the unity that had previously existed between Adam and Eve is shattered as Adam immediately blames his wife for the sin which they had committed together.
This brings a conflict and disharmony between them that would be passed down over time (Genesis 3.16), and we can see it unfold in the pages of Genesis in the accounts of numerous broken relationships—Cain’s murder of his brother, the depraved society of Sodom and Gomorrah, the distorted relationships between Sarah and Hagar, Jacob and Esau, Jacob and Laban, Joseph and his brothers, and more. But the problems certainly don’t stop there—this same conflict and disharmony continues to darken and distort our world today.
Our world is deeply flawed by sin, and this manifests itself everyday sociologically, as we treat one another in a wide array of horrible, messed up ways:
  • On an international level, countries wage war and kill because of conflict over ideology or resources.
  • Systemic evils such as poverty, abortion, racism, sex trafficking, government corruption, lotteries, and more stem from our exploitation of our neighbors in order that we might obtain our own selfish desires.
  • Horrific acts of incomprehensible violence fill our news cycles. Mass shootings at elementary schools, the use of passenger airliners as terrorist missiles, bombings at marathon finish lines and incomprehensible barbarity at soccer matches shock and dismay us and cause us to weep.
  • Our interpersonal relationships are also a mess. Dishonesty, reckless ambition, and violence abound. The (supposedly) lifelong bonds of marriage are broken on a whim.
And the sum result: our society as a whole stagnates and decays, as people live lives marked by self-interest and fear of one another. The community for which we were created is broken.
Sin destroys our relationships with one another.
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